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comments like that. he's proved her right. remember when rand paul came out against the civil rights act and then had to take it back when running for senate? remember how bad that was for him? did you hear what todd akin just said? stay with us. that's coming up. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! >>> i want to thank them for their help as well. and just in case anybody watching throughout the country, they are both available. no, no, no. only kidding, only kidding. only kidding, only kidding. ariana definitely is not available but ailer is. >> stop. >> this is ariana and this is ayla. i can see i'm going to get in trouble when i get home. >> that was scott brown the night he won the special election to fill the massachusetts senate seat two and a half years ago. right now in trying to get reelected, he faces a deficit among wome
paul came out against the civil rights act and then had to take it back when running for senate? remember how bad that was for him? did you hear what todd akin just said? stay with us. that's coming up. machine [ humming ] [ humming ] [ male announcer ] kraft macaroni & cheese. you know you love it. >>> i want to thank them for their help as well. and just in case anybody watching throughout the country, they are both available. no, no, no. only kidding, only kidding. only kidding, only kidding. ariana definitely is not available but ayla is. >> stop. >> this is ariana and this is ayla. i can see i'm going to get in trouble when i get home. >> that was scott brown the night he won the special election to fill the massachusetts senate seat two and a half years ago. right now in trying to get reelected, he faces a deficit among women voters of about 12 points. interestingly though, the most politically damaging thing about that awkward introduction to the national political universe might not have been what mr. brown said about his daughters while they tried to make him stop, but
to be mayor of san francisco? how about a mayor from the civil rights academy of harvey milk? we would be proud of that. i want to welcome everybody back. i know you had a great summer. i want you to approach this school like a sponge, soak up everything that you can learn. it is great to have knowledge about everything going on in the world, what is going on in the city. by the way, i will be supporting your parents and teachers and faculty to make this the best school in san francisco. how about that? [applause] and you are starting out fantastic. this is what san francisco is about. all the parents involved children and faculty to make this the best school. you have a mayor that will pay attention to our school, education, make sure you get the best education, because i want you to have my job some day. how about that? welcome back, welcome to the great school of harvey milk. you have a wonderful faculty who is going to teach you and expose you to a lot of different things to keep you active. we are going to help the city make sure your after-school programs are solid. thank you and
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state. it's a stunning rebuke to republicans and their shameless attempt to rig the system. just remember one of those state top gop lawmakers slipped up and said what these laws are all about. >> voter i.d., which is g
, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings have to be totally accessible. it also says that new buildings
. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they did not want james meredith there. your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we got to get order up there. that's what we thought was going to happen. >> mr. president, please, why don't you stop -- >> how can i remove him governor when there's a riot in the street and he might step out of the building and something -- let's get order up there and then we can do something. >> we've got to get somebody out there to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know the tone from my aunts and uncles. civil rights went from being important but not a heated issue during his pres
and the u.s. steel and so forth. the civil rights movement put pressure on washington to open up the american dream to blacks and other minorities. part of what happened to them was it was so successful. but part of what happened to them was there was a power shift. there was a tremendous change of power in washington, and that had big effect on the ability of middle class americans to achieve the american dream. the other thing that happened is what i call wedge economics. the splitting of the american middle class off from the games of the national economy. so that today you can see the economy improving bit by bit by middle class people aren't doing that much better. people at the top are doing real well. corporations are reporting profits, but the people in the middle aren't doing that well. back in the old days tbhak the heyday of the middle class, everybody sharedded in that prosperity. today everybody doesn't share in that prosperity. that's why so many people feel so much pain. >> suarez: you take us again and again in the book to key moments where things could have gone
is inherently unequal. and in the 1960s opening new vistas of civil rights for individuals. and now like much of the nation, polarized and often riven with disaffection while it tends towards what is viewed as conservative world view. the court over its history has given euphoric moments of progress and unfortunate stagnation of the status quo that is desperately needed shaking. but just for clear here's to hoping that justices breyer, ginsberg, society mayor kagan can find the fifth vote that they need to move us forward not backwards. that's my view. on current tv. >>i feel like i don't even know you. >>just stay on your side of the screen, okay? >>brought to you by geico. 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance. visit geico.com for a free rate >> eliot: call it a total and complete failure of the justice system. call it a modern day witch-hunt. call it anything but the way the legal system is supposed to work in this country. it's become a well-known story. in 1993 three children were brutally murdered in the woods of west memphis arkansas. three men who were later to become kno
, for example when after the civil rights movement experienced a deep not only resegregation due to taxes but also an elevation of private schools so people can control their private educational spaces. and so this is a really serious crisis. we can't have a shared democracy if we don't share a robust public fear. education is the critical linchpin to maintaining that space. >> cenk: one more thing professor rose if we were all in the same boat, we might be much better off. you think that in l.a. stephen spielberg's kids, tom hanks' kids all the rich movie producers, if they all had to send their kids to public schools, the public schools wouldn't be much better? >> right, not only would they be much better, but we would be able to understand why schools that hoard resources by controlling high tax bases and leaving poor-tax base with fewer resources we would understand why there is such a differential. working people, working parents working teachers who are workers are paying the price that we're balancing the economy on their backs. until there is collective buy-in its difficult to see
brown, diana's co-director of the advancement project, a civil rights organization that filed the lawsuit. thank you for your time. we played that state lawmaker who said if that law was in effect in pennsylvania, he felt that governor romney would win that state, done. the polling shows opposite. nevertheless there was a concern. let's talk about the split decision. the judge is blocking it for now, but what happens next? >> well, you know, this is a big victory for democracy. it paves the way for free, fair, and accessible voting. we know that there were hundreds of thousands of people who would have been impacted by this and would not have had the i.d. we're very pleased that, in fact, in november people can vote without that i.d. we will continue to fight this law because we know that in the end that it impacts elderly voters, young voters and people of color and veterans in the state of pennsylvania. >> what's interesting and the irony we've been talking about is that there was always a great debate that there was no proof of significant voter fraud, not just in pennsylva
years ago. it brought together civil rights leaders then and now. i was too young in '65, so were you, but we're not too young now. we must maintain what they won in '65. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> does romney like you? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. on the way to denver. let me start with this brand new nbc/wall street journal poll out tonight. what it shows in addition to an obama leading that's hardening is a deep concern that mitt romney said about that 47% of the country he says can't be counted on to meet its responsibility. it's that part of the country that romney has dismissed as free-loaders, moochers, takers. people, especially veteran families, people retired on social security, regular americans, that is, don't like being dismissed that way, injury added by insult. i'm joined by chuck todd and howard fineman with "the huffington post." the latest poll shows among likely voters the president leads 49% to 46% for romney. that's down net two points from two weeks ago when the pres
these claims. >> probably one of the last groups of people you would think about having voting rights. civil rights groups with battling it out in florida to make sure former felons can vote. now, that's what i call a test drive. silverado! the most dependable, longest lasting, full-size pickups on the road. so, what do you think? [ engine revs ] i'll take it. [ male announcer ] it's chevy truck month. now during chevy truck month, get 0% apr financing for 60 months or trade up to get the 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition with a total value of $8,000. hurry in before they're all gone! it's called passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. so does aarp, serving americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp dicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. to find out more, call today. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have
. this is a civil lawsuit, which means fines not jail time, if they're convicted of this? >> right. so you know, the only major sort of trial that's come from the wall street meltdown happened in 2009 when two bear sterns hedge fund managers were found not guilty of inflating the price of their mortgage-backed securities. really that is the big criticism here. h who is paying the price? jp morgan is trying to distance itself from this, stregs that the lawsuit deals with bear sterns. that's understandable. securities in question, they were issued long before it bought bear, in 2006 and 2007. jp morgan is still planning to contest these allegations with jp morgan saying it's disappointed that the attorney general pursued its civil action without offering us an opportunity to rebut these claims. >> probably one of the last groups of people you would think about having voting rights. civil rights groups with battling it out in florida to make sure former felons can vote. now, that's what i call a test drive. silverado! the most dependable, longest lasting, full-size pickups on the road. so, what do
in florida but around the country? and all of the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand your ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone, they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, marsproctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed, and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators -- we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> alright, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan. and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in loo
-ann, the old republican party supported civil rights. when you define liberal and conservative, people support medicare with all their hearts and they do like this stuff, they like that we have a mixed capitalism with some social welfare mixed in to soften it and that makes them practical people and makes them liberal in a sense of functionality but not, i'm a liberal. your thoughts? >> you know, i agree. chris, two things have happened over the course of the last 20, 30 years. you have this slow turning away from the ideas of the new deal, at least from other people. the notions that these are handouts when it applies to other people, just by default, any democratic that gets elected, it was illegitimate. and then clinton comes along, he's illegit. you had it with kennedy. dead people in chicago really elected him. then clinton came along. he did win. i would think there was this notion that bill clinton was inherently illegitimate and nothing too extreme to dislodge him from the white house because he was de-facto illegitimate. and i think with barack obama, this notion that this could not h
. >> but i think that the issue is, before my time, e eliberal republicans that stood up for civil rights in the '60s, where are those voices in the republican party it today saying i don't agree with a lot of the things, economic policies but democracy should be nonnegotiable. >> where you know what, this gets to a larger issue. where is the leadership, where is the courage within the republican party. i mean we were talking about this at the time of the birther nonsense, where were the grownups and the republican parties saying to its own members look, you are not only questioning the legitimacy of president obama, but you're questioning the legitimacy of the president of the united states. based on nothing. based on a lie and based on a racist lie and not one person would step forward, any kind of stature within the republican party and say enough. to your point, there's no outrage over this because, you know, quite frankly i think the republican leadership is being held hostage by sort of the last gapses of the far right wing. >> the fear based decision making. >> and shouldn't mitt r
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pennsylvania is now one of 33 states with voter identification laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
that blatantly went the wrong way because of a ref's call. our most important civil-rights is voting. it is what everything else relies on. this is not a casual thing. even if it does not turn an election. in a state that is solidly blue or solidly red -- whether or not it changes the outcome. as with the nfl refs, it did get settled very quickly after everybody on national television saw a game go the wrong way, and, tragically, it may take something like that for voter i.d. and voter suppression to get the attention it deserves. >> michael onesteel joined in. -- michael wants to join in. >> i have no idea what the right percentage should be, but it is under 1%. another topic that is way down that we believe should be more of the coverage is money in politics, the fund raising. it is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying to do with our project is to bring awareness to these types of issues from a data perspective, so it is not just anecdotal. i think we all know about it, but is it being given enough percentage of coverage is i think a legitimate question. >> or what
marriage equality, i think it is constitutionally guaranteed with the civil-rights of the '60s. >> host: john is the independent. >> caller: mr. johnson mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. our taxes have never been set up to be fair. originally for the rich to pay them majority of taxes in federal taxes and a working class or poor would pay the majority of there's of homeowners gomez city, and state taxes. my problem with a fair tax is we're on a fixed income. the states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government has such a low were one. if someone buys a refrigerator at $700 there will be the $100 tax. that is the problem. the only when it will hurt are the people that are retired, disability, and the things like that. otherwise i am in completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul. i voted for paul brown. i cannot remember what year he ran. i voted for ross perot once. i am very open-minded better watch things closely. >> host: thank you for calling. gary johnson and the reaction? >> guest: by going to a national consumption tax
kinds of things. the civil rights act of 1964? if you're a libertarian might sound reasonable. if you apply for a job and the employer and employee agree on a salary, who's the government to get in there? some people in this country have decided discrimination is bad. that was todd akin coming out in favor of discrimination in the workplace not just against women. against anybody. so what's to stop a business from not hiring people of a race or religion or sexual orientation they don't like? under todd akin, nothing right? yeah, what a guy. so i'm going to have you play that about four times during this episode. i think it's more shocking than legitimate rape. 1-866-55-press. i'm john fuglesang filling in for bill all morning on your current radio and tv, this is the "bill press show." we'll be right back. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." live on your radio and current tv. >> announcer: heard around the >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." >> john: this is the "bill press show." this is
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
presidency. imagine what it would mean for civil rights and voting rights and so much more. >> reporter: but if the president is re-elected, what effect would it have on the court? >> well, president obama could have big impact on the court is if one of the more conservative justices, like swing vote anthony kennedy or justice antonin scalia who are both in their mid-70s, if they retired, then president obama could replace a conservative or a right leaning moderate. >> reporter: here's who could make the nominee list if president obama wins a second term. california attorney general harris is getting a lot of buzz. >> the california attorney general has political experience, which is really missing on the court right now. >> reporter: another name circulating is ja kwlen wen. if she's nominated, the california-based federal appeals judge would make history as the court's first asian-american justice. but that's no guarantee. and for example if ruth bader ginsburg is the only justice to retire, the liberal side of the court would not get any bigger. just a little younger. >> and as you k
written right after the civil war. >> what's this mean on the ground for people voting? i was worried about this law. now i'm worried people still think the law is in effect. it's called intimidation, not just suppression. >> it was a huge victory today, chris, like your other guests, and i think them for their partnership and i thank everybody for helping us to push this thing back past november 6th. our game now has transformed somewhat. because there's a portion of this that the judge allowed. that is that the government here in pennsylvania can still talk about the law even though it's not to be implemented. so our game, chris, has shifted. we're going to remind voters you do not need identification to vote because i suspect in the next five weeks, mr. corbett, mr. romney, mr. turzei, mr. metcalfe and their friends will attempt to create confusion and chaos now that we beat this back. we're going to be just as vigorous now as we have been. your prior guest on the prior segment talked about anger. let me tell you something, chris, there's a lot of angry voters in pennsylvania. mitt
of the plaintiff lawsuits. >> sure does. >> plaintiff attorneys brought the exact same civil case. >> right. >> why do we think this is going to be a new model for anything? >> they say it's a model for the feds and the state attorneys general to work together. new york has this martin act that other attorneys generally in new york have used quite a bit in the past. >> to the extent that they bring more cases like this, civil cases, do you think this does anything to feed the public's lust for whatever you think, whatever you think president obama was trying to go for a year ago when he created this group in. >> if the public is lusting for ceos being perp walked over the financial crieses they're not going to get it with this and may not ever because they haven't been able to build the criminal cases, they're tough to make, if there was criminal conduct you have to get the lower executives to plead or cooperate. >> is there anything to indicate there are criminal cases that could come from these things in. >> this doesn't read like a criminal case. it reads like a civil case, like a lot of the pla
is slapping jpmorgan with a civil suit. jpmorgan brought a very distressed -- during the height of the financial crisis. harvey pitt joins me now. here is jpmorgan response right now. the new york attorney general relates to bear stearns which we acquired over the course of a weekend on behalf of the u.s. government. this complaint is entirely about historic honda by that entity. do they have a good argument? >> i think they do. one of the issues is whether they acquired full responsibilities for all the tire responsibilities. i think they have a good argument. melissa: jamie dimon think he was probably getting, or something to that effect of, he was getting a lot of liability here. interesting enough, this karla sanchez, who was an attorney for the group that sued them privately, now she has moved over to the attorney general's office. in fact, that is one of their other complaints. jpmorgan says it is generally recycled litigation. >> well, i think this whole filing of the lawsuit and particularly the timing on the eve of the first residential debate, all of this strikes me as
voters. coach makes a good point. civilized debate is always the way to go. >> that's what we do every day. >> yeah, right. >> tom kierein is here with our forecast. hi, tom. >> good morning. there is the washington monument and jefferson memorial. so far they are dry. >>> just a few miles away, it's raining, and it's wet, and the pavement is wet. if you're coming in down through 70 or in from 66 this morning, all coming from a conveyor belt of rain associated with a front and an area of low pressure. right now closer to home, we're getting closer to moderate rain. right now raining pretty hard from right near burke, virginia, in western fairfax county through northern prince william from manassas to hay market, and then across northern fauquier county up through front royal. moderate rain in loudoun county, panhandle of west virginia too, and up toward hagerstown. this is going to be heading toward frederick in the next half hour. closer to washington, just a few sprinkles around the immediate metro area. some of those showers moving right into the western suburbs. just near 60 montgo
distribution based on "free will or volitional control" which applies on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)